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Rinderpest.

Archives news, shiny things, and other bricolage.

Long-extinct heath hen comes to life in archival film - The Boston Globe

awesomearchives:

A clip of the video is at the link.

via Kottke

6 months ago - 11
‘“Able Seacat” Simon. In 1949, during the Yangtze Incident, he received the PDSA's Dickin Medal after surviving injuries from a cannon shell, raising morale, and killing off a rat infestation during his service.’

‘“Able Seacat” Simon. In 1949, during the Yangtze Incident, he received the PDSA's Dickin Medal after surviving injuries from a cannon shell, raising morale, and killing off a rat infestation during his service.’

cats dickinmedal ableseacat
gazettedubonton:

Zibeline et matelassé de soie by Bianchini-Férier.
1922.

gazettedubonton:

Zibeline et matelassé de soie by Bianchini-Férier.

1922.

"Les Colchiques" [The Crocuses], pochoir print by Barbier. Gazette du Bon Ton, 1913.

"Les Colchiques" [The Crocuses], pochoir print by Barbier. Gazette du Bon Ton, 1913.

french fashion fashion history pochoir 1910s

exdollhead:

Ellen Schinderman

danielmcbatman:

rookiemag:

womeninspace:

NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg is a self proclaimed crafter. A week ago she made a stuffed dinosaur from scraps on the space station. The little T-rex is made form the lining of Russian food containers and the toy is stuffed with scraps from an old T-shirt. While many toys have flown into space, this is the first produced in space.

Photos: Karen Nyberg, via CollectSpace

so awesome.

danielmcbatman:

smithsonianmag:

This Insect Has The Only Mechanical Gears Ever Found in Nature
By Joseph Stromberg
Photo by Malcom Burrows
To the best of our knowledge, the mechanical gear—evenly-sized teeth cut into two different rotating surfaces to lock them together as they turn—was invented sometime around 300 B.C.E. by Greek mechanics who lived in Alexandria. In the centuries since, the simple concept has become a keystone of modern technology, enabling all sorts of machinery and vehicles, including cars and bicycles.
As it turns out, though, a three-millimeter long hopping insect known as Issus coleoptratus beat us to this invention. Malcolm Burrows and Gregory Sutton, a pair of biologists from the University of Cambridge in the U.K., discovered that juveniles of the species have an intricate gearing system that locks their back legs together, allowing both appendages to rotate at the exact same instant, causing the tiny creatures jump forward.
The finding, which was published today in Science, is believed to be the first functional gearing system ever discovered in nature. Insects from the Issus genus, which are commonly called “planthoppers,” are found throughout Europe and North Africa. Burrows and Sutton used electron microscopes and high-speed video capture to discover the existence of the gearing and figure out its exact function.
Read more about the first mechanical gears ever found in nature at Smithsonian.com.

This is bonkers

danielmcbatman:

smithsonianmag:

This Insect Has The Only Mechanical Gears Ever Found in Nature

By Joseph Stromberg

Photo by Malcom Burrows


To the best of our knowledge, the mechanical gear—evenly-sized teeth cut into two different rotating surfaces to lock them together as they turn—was invented sometime around 300 B.C.E. by Greek mechanics who lived in Alexandria. In the centuries since, the simple concept has become a keystone of modern technology, enabling all sorts of machinery and vehicles, including cars and bicycles.

As it turns out, though, a three-millimeter long hopping insect known as Issus coleoptratus beat us to this invention. Malcolm Burrows and Gregory Sutton, a pair of biologists from the University of Cambridge in the U.K., discovered that juveniles of the species have an intricate gearing system that locks their back legs together, allowing both appendages to rotate at the exact same instant, causing the tiny creatures jump forward.

The finding, which was published today in Science, is believed to be the first functional gearing system ever discovered in nature. Insects from the Issus genus, which are commonly called “planthoppers,” are found throughout Europe and North Africa. Burrows and Sutton used electron microscopes and high-speed video capture to discover the existence of the gearing and figure out its exact function.

Read more about the first mechanical gears ever found in nature at Smithsonian.com.

This is bonkers

Tintype by photographer Ed Drew, shot and developed while he was serving in Afghanistan in the Air Force Combat Search and Rescue Unit. More cool photos on his webpage.

Tintype by photographer Ed Drew, shot and developed while he was serving in Afghanistan in the Air Force Combat Search and Rescue Unit. More cool photos on his webpage.

tintype photography eddrew military

afroarabia:

"boys dont like it when-" 

image

PERFECTION

(Source: niqabisinparis, via moon--cunt)

vintagegal:

Susan Peters on a publicity photo for Random Harvest (1942)

what I can’t

vintagegal:

Susan Peters on a publicity photo for Random Harvest (1942)

what I can’t

(via vintagegal)